Rangitoto

I tend to be out before sunrise, jogging, cycling or walking Ed. Watching the sun come up behind Rangitoto is a brilliant way to start each day. Most days I take her picture and I have about 5,000 of them gathering digital cobwebs. For 365 days I posted them on a dedicated Facebook page, Rangiphoto. It’s been a difficult habit to break.

Wikipedia has this to say:
Rangitoto Island is a volcanic island in the Hauraki Gulf near Auckland, New Zealand. The 5.5 km wide island is an iconic and widely visible landmark of Auckland with its distinctive symmetrical shield volcano cone rising 260 metres (850 ft) high over the Hauraki Gulf.[1][2] Rangitoto is the most recent and the largest (2311 hectares)[3] of the approximately 50 volcanoes of the Auckland Volcanic Field.[2] It is separated from the mainland of Auckland’s North Shore by the Rangitoto Channel. Since World War II it has been linked by a causeway to the much older, non-volcanic Motutapu Island.[4]

Rangitoto is Māori for ‘Bloody Sky’,[5] with the name coming from the full phrase Ngā Rangi-i-totongia-a Tama-te-kapua (‘The days of the bleeding of Tama-te-kapua’). Tama-te-kapua was the captain of the Arawa waka (canoe) and was badly wounded on the island, at a (lost) battle with the Tainui iwi (tribe) at Islington Bay